Epstein Barr Virus News and Research

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Epstein-Barr virus, frequently referred to as EBV, is a member of the herpesvirus family and one of the most common human viruses. The virus occurs worldwide, and most people become infected with EBV sometime during their lives. In the United States, as many as 95% of adults between 35 and 40 years of age have been infected. Infants become susceptible to EBV as soon as maternal antibody protection (present at birth) disappears. Many children become infected with EBV, and these infections usually cause no symptoms or are indistinguishable from the other mild, brief illnesses of childhood. In the United States and in other developed countries, many persons are not infected with EBV in their childhood years. When infection with EBV occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, it causes infectious mononucleosis 35% to 50% of the time.

Symptoms of infectious mononucleosis are fever, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Sometimes, a swollen spleen or liver involvement may develop. Heart problems or involvement of the central nervous system occurs only rarely, and infectious mononucleosis is almost never fatal. There are no known associations between active EBV infection and problems during pregnancy, such as miscarriages or birth defects. Although the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis usually resolve in 1 or 2 months, EBV remains dormant or latent in a few cells in the throat and blood for the rest of the person's life. Periodically, the virus can reactivate and is commonly found in the saliva of infected persons. This reactivation usually occurs without symptoms of illness.
Resistance against Epstein-Barr virus from experimental monoclonal antibodies

Resistance against Epstein-Barr virus from experimental monoclonal antibodies

Epstein-Barr virus reactivation likely to blame for long COVID symptoms

Epstein-Barr virus reactivation likely to blame for long COVID symptoms

TGen identifies genetic target that could help explain the variation in COVID-19 effects

TGen identifies genetic target that could help explain the variation in COVID-19 effects

EBV viral genome modifies the host epigenetic landscape to promote gastric cancer

EBV viral genome modifies the host epigenetic landscape to promote gastric cancer

Researchers comprehensively describe the 'human tissue virome atlas'

Researchers comprehensively describe the 'human tissue virome atlas'