Omega 3 Fatty Acid News and Research

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Omega-3 is an essential fatty acid (EFA), consisting of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). Oily fish, including anchovies, sardines, mackerel, and salmon, are the only known natural sources of Omega-3 EPA/DHA. ALA is found in plants, such as flax and chia. It is important to note that only EPA and DHA contribute to the many health benefits associated with Omega-3. While the body can convert ALA into EPA/DHA, it does so very inefficiently (less than one percent), making it impossible to derive Omega-3-related health benefits from plant sources. Furthermore, although Omega-3 EPA/DHA is vital to overall good health, the human body is not able to produce it on its own, so supplementation is required, either by eating oily fish or foods fortified with Omega-3 EPA/DHA, or by taking fish oil supplements.
Survey of planktonic lipids predicts a temperature-linked decrease in essential omega-3 fatty acids

Survey of planktonic lipids predicts a temperature-linked decrease in essential omega-3 fatty acids

Meat and meat-based substitutes vary widely in their nutritional content

Meat and meat-based substitutes vary widely in their nutritional content

Adolescents with higher omega-3 levels in blood are less likely to acquire psychotic illness

Adolescents with higher omega-3 levels in blood are less likely to acquire psychotic illness

Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids helps improve prognosis in event of myocardial infarction

Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids helps improve prognosis in event of myocardial infarction