Rett Syndrome News and Research

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Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental disorder that mostly occurs in females. Infants with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first, but then stop developing and even lose skills and abilities. For instance, they stop talking even though they used to say certain words. They lose their ability to walk properly. They stop using their hands to do things and often develop stereotyped hand movements, such as wringing, clapping, or patting their hands. Rett syndrome is considered one of the autism spectrum disorders. Most cases of Rett syndrome are caused by a mutation on the MECP2 gene, which is found on the X chromosome.
Scientists develop microscopy technology that observes how new neurons struggle to reach their developmental destination

Scientists develop microscopy technology that observes how new neurons struggle to reach their developmental destination

RNA targeted by small molecule drugs, likely to create new pathways for disease treatment

RNA targeted by small molecule drugs, likely to create new pathways for disease treatment

Researchers show how two X chromosomes communicate during embryo development

Researchers show how two X chromosomes communicate during embryo development

Researchers map DNA methylation changes to study developmental disorders

Researchers map DNA methylation changes to study developmental disorders

RNA editing repair technique shows promise for treating neurological disorders

RNA editing repair technique shows promise for treating neurological disorders

New mechanism shows promise for treating certain congenital disorders

New mechanism shows promise for treating certain congenital disorders

Foxg1 gene works like a molecular knob to modulate electrical activity of the neurons

Foxg1 gene works like a molecular knob to modulate electrical activity of the neurons

Distinct loss-of-function variants cause shared clinical features in neuronal development disorders

Distinct loss-of-function variants cause shared clinical features in neuronal development disorders