Uncovering the Role of Faulty Signalling in Immune Cell Development

An autoimmune disease occurs when the body’s own cells are attacked by the immune system in addition to external pathogens.

Uncovering the Role of Faulty Signalling in Immune Cell Development

Image Credit: Medical University of Vienna

It has now been demonstrated by a research team under the direction of Marta Rizzi, University of Freiburg, Medical University of Vienna that the body’s malfunctioning signaling pathways are crucial to the immune cell’s development. This creates the possibility of developing novel treatment strategies for autoimmune conditions like autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). The journal Science Immunology has published the study as of right now.

The findings show how profound the effects of signaling pathway disorders are on the functioning of our immune system and help us to better understand the mechanisms of immune cell development and function.”

Marta Rizzi, Research Group Leader, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Freiburg

Rizzi is also a Professor of Clinical Experimental Immunology at the Medical University of Vienna.

Important Insights Into the Development of Immune Cells

The control of apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is largely dependent on the FAS signaling pathway. But the signaling pathway’s activation also affects non-fatal functions like B cell maturation in the human immune system. According to the study, abnormalities in this signaling pathway may cause issues with B cell development and function.

Image Credit: ART-ur/Shutterstock.com

Image Credit: ART-ur/Shutterstock.com

In the next step, we will look for ways in which these findings can support us in the treatment of patients.”

Marta Rizzi, Research Group Leader, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Freiburg.

Rizzi is also a member of the Cluster of Excellence Center for Integrative Biological Signaling Studies (CIBSS) at the University of Freiburg.

Source:
Journal reference:

Staniek, J., et al. (2024) Non-apoptotic FAS signaling controls mTOR activation and extrafollicular maturation in human B cells. Science Immunology. doi.org/10.1126/sciimmunol.adj5948

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